About your Search

20110301
20110331
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
. he was just 20 years old. his father, albert, joins us now from york, pennsylvania. mr. snyder, what was your reaction to today's supreme court decision? >> i was kind of shocked. i can't believe that the supreme court today has now told us that we have no rights to bury our dead in peace. it's a sad day for our military men and women, their families. it's a sad day for all americans. my first thought is what kind of society have we become? >> couric: are you surprised the decision was so overwhelming with eight out of nine justices backing the protesters? >> yes, i was, katie. they may be book smart but they don't have the common sense god gave a goat. you know, the justices and the government will send their children to war, and they'll send them back in body bags, and then they can't even give us enough respect to bury them in peace. >> couric: the church has protested outside many other funerals. what would you say to other grieving families today? >> well, there's not much we can do about it anymore. when the government won't do anything about it, and the courts give us no remed
pictures, ro, take a look. >> couric: tonight, libya's oil facilities under attack as the u.s. gets set to talk to nato allies about imposing a no-fly zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, a difficult ash wednesday for some catholics. parishioners in the philadelphia area learn if their priest is suspected of sex abuse. the suspect in the tucson massacre comes face to face with some of the victims. and overnight, a mother of one becomes a mother to nine keeping her family together after tragedy strikes. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. what, if anything, can the obama administration do about the situation in libya? as the white house continues to weigh its options, moammar qaddafi's forces keep pounding the opposition from the air and on the ground. 30 miles from tripoli, government troops retook most of zawiyah today after almost a week of bitter fighting. hospital officials report dozens of deaths on both sides. in the east, where the rebels control almost all
across the pacific to the u.s. reaching the west coast. japan declares a state of emergency at a nuclear plant as radiation levels surge. the area around it is evacuated. and the ring of fire. why this area of the pacific is so vulnerable to earthquakes. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it is saturday morning in japan. the sun is up and the extent of the catastrophe is becoming painfully clear. it's been nearly 24 hours since a powerful earthquake touched off a huge tsunami that swept across japan's east coast. the quake, a magnitude 8.9, was the fifth-largest in modern history. centered off japan's northeast coast, it was felt for 1,300 miles. very early reports say more than 400 people are dead. japan's kyoto news agency says the final number is expected to top 1,000. most of the victims drowned. nearly 1,000 are reported injured, more than 500 are missing. and four million homes and businesses lost power. the first estimate of the damage: $10 billion. that dama
are soaring and the area is being evacuated. most flights between the u.s. and japan have been canceled, and there were fear it is tsunami would pound the u.s., but by the time the waves reached hawaii and the west coast this morning, they had lost most of their punch. president obama said he's heartbroken by the disaster. u.s. assistance is already on the way to japan. lucy craft is there. >> reporter: the monster quake, thought to be the largest in japan's history triggered a ferocious series of tsunamis. a 23-foot wall of water poured over the northern japanese coastline with little warning. only minutes after the quick hit sweeping away everything and everyone in its path. cars were tossed like toys. boats were battered by the tides. this tanker was swept up on to the shore. another ship fought to escape a massive whirlpool. and the state of the boat and its crew is unknown. >> a tsunami obviously coming in several sweeps. >> reporter: minutes later a a second deadly wave. surging water overtook coastal city streets, ripping fishing boats from their moorings and swamping buildings.
the rebels in several key cities, u.s. aid arrives in tunisia for refugees fleeing the violence. the tragic death of a star high school athlete just moments after he leads his team to victory. and they call this the most dangerous eight seconds in sports. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. president obama is keeping his exuberance in check over today's news about unemployment. he calls it progress. the unemployment rate-- 9% or higher for a record 21 months-- has finally dropped below that mark, falling last month to 8.9%. and the pace of hiring is picking up. the economy added 192,000 jobs. anthony mason is our senior business correspondent. anthony, the recession has been officially over for months now. finally it looks like the job market is catching up. >> reporter: after months of disappointingly weak numbers, katie, the labor market is finally flexing some muscle. in wisconsin this week, the oshkosh corporation was hiring 750 workers to make military vehicles. >>
't predict how long the operation will last, he did say the u.s. could transfer control of it to allied by saturday. meanwhile, house speaker boehner wrote to president obama today to complain that the mission's goals are not clearly defined. more now from mark phillips in tripoli. >> reporter: day five of the bombing campaign over libya and the combined coalition air forces have declared something like victory. >> their air force no longer exists as a fighting force. to the point that we can operat. >> reporter: control of the skies has led to near control on the ground, as moammar qaddafi's forces have learned. and as the bombing has continued, the brave face of the regime is showing some worry lines. instead of rambling on for hours as he often does, moammar qaddafi's latest pep rally's speech lasted a brief three minutes. out in public is a risky place for him to be these days. and where the obedient cheering crowds once numbered in tens of thousands, now they are often down to a few hundred, sometimes to mere dozens. even the regime's once p.r. machine is grinding down. today after
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)